Vancouver Museums and Galleries

Vancouver Art Gallery

Located in Vancouver’s downtown core, the Vancouver Art Gallery is the largest art gallery in Western Canada and is one of the most respected in Canada. The Vancouver Art Gallery is home to international travelling pieces from various artists as well as over 200 permanent pieces by the noteworthy Emily Carr, a local British Columbian.

As the Vancouver Art Gallery contains a deep collection of historical pieces, some refer to it as an art museum rather than an art gallery. Time-honoured architecture and a centralized location make the Vancouver Art Gallery a popular host to indoor & outdoor public events. This only adds to the city’s character as all sorts of creative types entertain the passing crowd daily.

750 Hornby Street, Vancouver B.C.

Equinox

Equinox is the most popular gallery in Vancouver for those in the know. This gallery strives to only display art of the highest quality from internationally renowned Canadian sculptors, printmakers, photographers, and painters. Although not overtly controversial or tense, displays here range from high realism to abstract. Equinox is located across the Granville Street Bridge close to Broadway Street.

2321 Granville Street, Vancouver B.C.

Contemporary Art Gallery

The Contemporary Art Gallery has grown from a Canadian Government establishment in 1971, to the only independent non-profit public art gallery in downtown Vancouver. In 2005 the Contemporary Art Gallery collaborated with Rethink Communications to create a “Button Wall.” Over 50,000 buttons were pinned to the gallery’s exterior each with an individual word representing one of a hundred possible responses to contemporary art. People were permitted to take as many buttons home as they wished garnering the gallery loads of local recognition to further promote contemporary art.

The Contemporary Art Gallery stands apart from other Vancouver galleries as it not only exhibits visual art, it also facilitates education and outreach programs, organizes public talks, generates publications, and more.

555 Nelson Street, Vancouver B.C.

Museum of Anthropology

Located at the University of British Columbia, the Museum of Anthropology focuses on local First Nations art. A stunning assortment of First Nation totem poles, tools, and weaponry can be appreciated here. Many of these items are held at the Museum’s Visible Storage Gallery which is home to over 15,000 historic artefacts. The world’s largest collection of works by Bill Reid, an internationally recognized Haida artist, can also be found here including his most popular piece, “Raven and the First Men.”

6393 Northwest Marine Drive, Vancouver B.C.

Roedde House Museum

Built in 1893, Vancouver’s Roedde House Museum is a late-Victorian home restored to represent the day-to-day life of a middle class family at the turn of the last century. Unlike other house museums, rooms here are not roped off or behind glass. Some of the house’s objects can be touched and even handled with care.

The museum offers guided tours, lecture series’, and elementary school packages. The house and surrounding park area, which is neighboured by other heritage houses dating from 1890 to 1908, can be rented for weddings, meetings, receptions, photo shoots, and other private events.

1415 Barclay Street, Vancouver B.C.

Museum of Vancouver

The Museum of Vancouver is the largest civic museum in Canada and home to over 100,000 objects. Located just across the Burrard Street Bridge in Vancouver’s Vanier Park, this museum boasts permanent exhibits which date back to the early 1900’s. These exhibits help illustrate Vancouver’s story and are used to provoke conversations on Vancouver’s past, present, and future.

Visit the Museum of Vancouver’s official website before heading out to see what’s on display while you’re in town. The Museum of Vancouver offers affordable family packages and is a great place to spend a rainy day in the city.